Forecasters warn of 'turbulent' week amid warnings downpours could continue into next month

Forecasters warn of 'turbulent' week amid warnings downpours could continue into next month

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It’s a washout..until the end of October! Forecasters warn of ‘turbulent’ week amid warnings torrential downpours could continue into next month

  • The Met Office has issued a yellow rain warning across areas in Northern Ireland and Scotland
  • Gusts of 40mph are expected over the Irish sea, while up to 60mm of rain could fall
  • Temperatures will hit 60.8F (16C) in London and the South East on Monday, average for this time of year 

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Britons wearied by renewed coronavirus lockdown restrictions are set to be made more miserable by an onslaught of wind and rain which could last until the end of October. 

Heavy wind and rain is set to smash parts of the UK over the coming days, with a ‘turbulent’ week of weather ahead.

The Met Office has issued a yellow rain warning across areas in Northern Ireland and Scotland on both Monday and Tuesday, meaning those areas could see flooding.

Britons wearied by renewed coronavirus lockdown restrictions are set to be made more miserable by an onslaught of wind and rain which could last until the end of October

Britons wearied by renewed coronavirus lockdown restrictions are set to be made more miserable by an onslaught of wind and rain which could last until the end of October

Britons wearied by renewed coronavirus lockdown restrictions are set to be made more miserable by an onslaught of wind and rain which could last until the end of October

Gusts of 40mph are expected over the Irish sea, while up to 60mm of rain could fall, rising to 80mm in mountainous regions.

Luke Miall, a meteorologist at the Met Office, said: ‘Well there’s a turbulent week of weather ahead, it is starting to look wetter and windier.

‘Sunday evening will be dry for most of the UK, though rain will start to push through Northern Ireland, going into Scotland and northern England by Monday morning, suggesting a north-south split.

‘The wind will then start to pick up in the early hours of Monday in most regions.’

Heavy wind and rain is set to smash parts of the UK over the coming days, with a 'turbulent' week of weather ahead. Pictured: People enjoying Autumn sunshine on the Stormont estate in Belfast on Sunday

Heavy wind and rain is set to smash parts of the UK over the coming days, with a 'turbulent' week of weather ahead. Pictured: People enjoying Autumn sunshine on the Stormont estate in Belfast on Sunday

Heavy wind and rain is set to smash parts of the UK over the coming days, with a ‘turbulent’ week of weather ahead. Pictured: People enjoying Autumn sunshine on the Stormont estate in Belfast on Sunday

The Met Office has issued a yellow rain warning across areas in Northern Ireland and Scotland on both Monday and Tuesday, meaning those areas could see flooding. Pictured: The Met Office's weather map shows rain sweeping in on Monday

The Met Office has issued a yellow rain warning across areas in Northern Ireland and Scotland on both Monday and Tuesday, meaning those areas could see flooding. Pictured: The Met Office's weather map shows rain sweeping in on Monday

Rain is set to batter parts of the north on Monday

Rain is set to batter parts of the north on Monday

The Met Office has issued a yellow rain warning across areas in Northern Ireland and Scotland on both Monday and Tuesday, meaning those areas could see flooding. Pictured: The Met Office’s weather map shows rain sweeping in on Monday

Most of England will be fairly hazy across the day, with top temperatures hitting 60.8F (16C) in London and the South East, which is average for this time of year, though it will be cool where the rain is.

Mr Miall went on: ‘Going into Tuesday the rain will start to push towards Wales and the south-west of England, with most of the UK seeing rain at some point.

‘The winds will be much stronger on Tuesday with heavier showers in Northern Ireland and Scotland.’

He said this was due to a spell of high pressure and air being dragged in from the Mediterranean.

Wednesday is expected to be the warmest day next week, with some areas seeing 64.4F (18C) temperatures.

Mr Miall added: ‘Unlike this week where the weather has been fairly static, next week will be changeable with the rain having the most impact.

Gusts of 40mph are expected over the Irish sea, while up to 60mm of rain could fall, rising to 80mm in mountainous regions. Pictured: The Stormont estate in Northern Ireland on Sunday

Gusts of 40mph are expected over the Irish sea, while up to 60mm of rain could fall, rising to 80mm in mountainous regions. Pictured: The Stormont estate in Northern Ireland on Sunday

Gusts of 40mph are expected over the Irish sea, while up to 60mm of rain could fall, rising to 80mm in mountainous regions. Pictured: The Stormont estate in Northern Ireland on Sunday

Luke Miall, a meteorologist at the Met Office, said: 'Well there's a turbulent week of weather ahead, it is starting to look wetter and windier.' Pictured: Autumn colours reflect of a lake in Horsmonden, Kent, on Sunday

Luke Miall, a meteorologist at the Met Office, said: 'Well there's a turbulent week of weather ahead, it is starting to look wetter and windier.' Pictured: Autumn colours reflect of a lake in Horsmonden, Kent, on Sunday

Luke Miall, a meteorologist at the Met Office, said: ‘Well there’s a turbulent week of weather ahead, it is starting to look wetter and windier.’ Pictured: Autumn colours reflect of a lake in Horsmonden, Kent, on Sunday

‘This is fairly typical for the time of year.’

Fellow meteorologist Steven Keates warned Monday will signal ‘all change’ as low-pressure dominates the weather.

He said: ‘It will be all change from Monday when it is looking unsettled with heavy rain and the chance of some strong winds.

‘One area of low pressure to the north of the UK will join with another to the south forming one complex area of low pressure which will traverse the country.

‘The weather will stay cyclonic at least into the middle of the week and possibly through to next weekend.

‘We are expecting heavy rain at times, and it is worth noting that this will come with high spring tides on Monday. This is something we will be keeping an eye on.

Most of England will be fairly hazy on Monay, with top temperatures hitting 60.8F (16C) in London and the South East, which is average for this time of year, though it will be cool where the rain is. Pictured: A runner jogs past trees in Kensington Palace Gardens in London on Sunday

Most of England will be fairly hazy on Monay, with top temperatures hitting 60.8F (16C) in London and the South East, which is average for this time of year, though it will be cool where the rain is. Pictured: A runner jogs past trees in Kensington Palace Gardens in London on Sunday

Most of England will be fairly hazy on Monay, with top temperatures hitting 60.8F (16C) in London and the South East, which is average for this time of year, though it will be cool where the rain is. Pictured: A runner jogs past trees in Kensington Palace Gardens in London on Sunday

Mr Miall added: 'Unlike this week where the weather has been fairly static, next week will be changeable with the rain having the most impact.' Pictured: Bedgebury Pinetum in South-east London on Sunday

Mr Miall added: 'Unlike this week where the weather has been fairly static, next week will be changeable with the rain having the most impact.' Pictured: Bedgebury Pinetum in South-east London on Sunday

Mr Miall added: ‘Unlike this week where the weather has been fairly static, next week will be changeable with the rain having the most impact.’ Pictured: Bedgebury Pinetum in South-east London on Sunday

‘It may be something we issue warnings for.’ 

The Met Office has a yellow weather warning for rain in place for parts of Western Scotland from the early hours of Monday until Tuesday morning.

There is also a yellow rain warning for parts of Northern Ireland from 5am on Monday until 3am on Tuesday 

In Essex, cars were left submerged in water after high tides flooded coastal roads in Tollesbury on Sunday.  

A large section of the north Essex coast – including areas such as Clacton-on-Sea, Brightlingsea, Mersea Island, Colchester, Maldon and Tollesbury – were placed under a government flood alert earlier in the day.

The alert was in place between 12.30pm and 2.30pm, and warned that high tides would cause some flooding on coastal roads. 

The alert read: ‘Tides are expected to be higher than usual due to spring tides.

‘Clacton Promenade, Lee-over-Sands and Brightlingsea sea front may see some wave overtopping and spray.

‘The Strood at Mersea Island, Coast Road and car parks on the front at West Mersea, and the Hythe and Promenade at Maldon may be flooded.’

Fellow meteorologist Steven Keates warned Monday will signal 'all change' as low-pressure dominates the weather. Pictured: A hot air balloon on the horizon in Hampshire on Sunday

Fellow meteorologist Steven Keates warned Monday will signal 'all change' as low-pressure dominates the weather. Pictured: A hot air balloon on the horizon in Hampshire on Sunday

Fellow meteorologist Steven Keates warned Monday will signal ‘all change’ as low-pressure dominates the weather. Pictured: A hot air balloon on the horizon in Hampshire on Sunday 

The new wet weather could mark the start of unpleasant weather as winter draws closer. PIctured: People walking in St James's park in central London on Sunday

The new wet weather could mark the start of unpleasant weather as winter draws closer. PIctured: People walking in St James's park in central London on Sunday

The new wet weather could mark the start of unpleasant weather as winter draws closer. PIctured: People walking in St James’s park in central London on Sunday

Although Sunday's weather brought some picturesque scenes around the country, tomorrow it is set to get wetter. Pictured: Autumnal colours on display in woodland near Brockenhurst in the New Forest on Sunday

Although Sunday's weather brought some picturesque scenes around the country, tomorrow it is set to get wetter. Pictured: Autumnal colours on display in woodland near Brockenhurst in the New Forest on Sunday

Although Sunday’s weather brought some picturesque scenes around the country, tomorrow it is set to get wetter. Pictured: Autumnal colours on display in woodland near Brockenhurst in the New Forest on Sunday

The photos taken at Tollesbury show the scene during high tide, leaving cars stranded and pathways covered by water.

Tides were expected to drop later on this afternoon, with the public warned to take extra care.  

The coldest October on record was 1917, with an average temperature of just 6.6C (44F) – while the coldest day ever recorded in October was -11.7C (10.9F) at Dalwinnine in the Highlands on October 28, 1948. 

Bookmakers Coral have now cut the odds on this month beating that record from 6-4 to 4-5, and make it 1-2 for snow to fall UK this month, while it is now 4-9 for this winter to be the coldest since records began. 

A spokesman for the company said: ‘Winter is set to arrive early this year and with temperatures falling fast over the next few days, the odds have been slashed on this month ending as the coldest October on record.’ 

Last week, it emerged that Britain endured its wettest day on record earlier this month – with enough rainfall to fill Loch Ness.

October 3 brought an average of 31.7mm (1.25in) across the country, the most since records began 129 years ago.

The day of downpours came hours after Storm Alex battered Britain with 90mph gales. It beat the previous record of 29.8mm (1.17in) on August 25, 1986.  

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