Trump is talking about using tanks to quell the George Floyd protests but the Pentagon is getting cold feet

Mark Esper's urgings to governors to "dominate the battlespace" amid George Floyd protests were only meant as a show of support to the president, Pentagon officials told The Daily Beast. President Trump is considering invoking the Insurrection Act of 1807 to quell violent protests. There are already at least 17,000 National Guard troops deployed nationwide. He is also talking about using tanks on the streets. Several governors and military officials have voiced concern at the use of miltary troops in civilian areas. The Pentagon is now distancing itself from Trump's wish to send in troops regardless of states' wishes, according to The Daily Beast. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Having backed President Trump during a call to state governors, the Pentagon is increasingly distancing itself from his threats to mobilize troops to quell protest nationwide, according to The Daily Beast.¬† The president and Defense Secretary Mark Esper spoke to state governors on Monday to urge them to request military assistance in the face of ongoing protests at the death of George Floyd. According to a call leaked to the Washington Post, Esper told governors that the National Guard "stands ready" to assist and urged states to "dominate the battlespace" of protests that have turned violent.¬† Three unnamed Pentagon senior officials told The Beast that despite this call, they had not expected the president to act on it. They said that Esper spoke mainly as a show of support to the president, and had not expected a further deployment of troops. As of Monday morning, 17,000 National Guard troops had been deployed in 23 states and Washington DC. However, no state has requested assistance, subverting the normal process for domestic military intervention, Pentagon officials told The Beast.¬† Trump has also asked for detailed information on the kinds of military vehicles, including "tanks," that could be deployed, Pentagon officials told The Beast. A senior administration official said that this doesn't necessarily mean Trump wants to send tanks, The Beast reported. "I think that is just one of the military words he knows," the official reportedly said.¬† However, the rhetoric was amped up Tuesday in a highly symbolic move, when around 60 National Guard troops were stationed at the Lincoln Memorial in front of peaceful protesters.¬† Your Lincoln Memorial this evening. pic.twitter.com/QByGgWeDDm ‚ÄĒ Martha Raddatz (@MarthaRaddatz) June 3, 2020 It followed a White House address on Monday night, in which the president declared himself the "president of law and order" and said he would invoke the Insurrection Act of 1807 if a state "refuses to take the actions that are necessary to defend the life and property of their residents." The Insurrection Act would allow the president to make a unilateral decision to send in further troops, circumventing governors' objections. New York's Attorney General Letitia James also said she was willing to take the matter to court to resist troops, The Beast reported.¬† Pentagon officials are aware of at least three governors dealing with active protests who have privately pleaded with the department not to send troops, saying it would only inflame things further, The Beast reported. As of Tuesday morning, around 5,600 people had been arrested nationwide in the protests.¬† The revelation to The Beast reflects unease amongst some military leaders at the deployments.¬† One unnamed defense official told CNN that "there is an intense desire for local law enforcement to be in charge." Army Maj. Gen. Thomas Carden, the adjutant general of the Georgia National Guard, said that while his troops were "honored" to be deployed, he said it is not a situation Americans should "get used to." Esper has also said that he didn't know where he was heading when he accompanied the president to the now-infamous photo opportunity at St John's Episcopal Church. He also washed his hands of any foreknowledge that protesters had been forcibly cleared from the area.¬† Read the full report at The Daily BeastJoin the conversation about this story ¬Ľ

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A BAD DAY FOR FLAT EARTHERS THANKS TO SPACEX

from FLAT EARTH BROTHERS: A BAD DAY FOR FLAT EARTHERS THANKS TO SPACEX CURVE FOOTAGE ACCORDING TO MSM VIDEO: I keep seeing in the news that the ‚Äúhistoric launch‚ÄĚ was bad news for flat earthers. I wanted to share this damaging footage so people can see what these articles are speaking of. Why They Lie [‚Ķ]

Continue Reading A BAD DAY FOR FLAT EARTHERS THANKS TO SPACEX

Some Black Lives Matter protesters have been riding horses to protests. Lil Nas X gave one of them props on Twitter.

Lil Nas X, of "Old Town Road" fame, retweeted a video of a group of people riding to a Houston Black Lives Matter protest on horseback on Tuesday. "The time has arrived," the rapper wrote. Protesters in four cities have ridden horses during protests to cheers from the crowd. Police officers have also been riding horses as a form of crowd control. One mounted officer in Houston trampled a woman, prompting Mayor Sylvester¬†Turner to apologize to the woman directly.¬† Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. On Tuesday, an estimated 60,000 people marched in downtown Houston, George Floyd's childhood home, to protest his police-involved killing. About two dozen of them showed up on horseback. The Nonstop Riders, an urban trail riding club, joined the protest to cheers from the crowd. One video, taken by NBC News reporter Mike Hixenbaugh, was retweeted by Lil Nas X of "Old Town Road" fame. "The time has arrived," he wrote. the time has arrived https://t.co/gI1GKRFOrm ‚ÄĒ nope (@LilNasX) June 2, 2020 While the Nonstop Riders captured the attention of Lil Nas X, they are not the first Black Lives Matter protesters on horseback. Demonstrators in Chicago, Minnesota and Oakland have also adopted the tactic, which were common during the North Dakota Pipeline protests.¬† Brianna Noble rode her horse, Dapper Dan, to a protest in Oakland last Friday. When asked by The Guardian why she brought Dapper Dan, she said the idea came to her while she was watching the video of police officers kneeling on Floyd. "I'm just another protester if I go down there alone, but no one can ignore a black woman sitting on top of a horse," Noble said.¬† Brianna Noble rides her horse Dapper Dan through Downtown Oakland on Friday joining a protest over the Minneapolis police killing of George Floyd. Photographed for @KQEDnews pic.twitter.com/oXmxJNWkux ‚ÄĒ Beth LaBerge (@bethlaberge) June 1, 2020 Adam Hollingsworth, or the "Dreadhead Cowboy," was the first protester seen riding a horse at demonstrations over Floyd's death. He made his first appearance in Minneapolis on May 27, joining in chants and, at one point, standing on his horse while flashing his middle finger at the police. Floyd died in Minneapolis on May 25. Minneapolis responding to the horrifying video of #GeorgeFloyd. protesters Water bottles being met by police with Bean bags and tears gas. And then this....a horse I have never seen this in a protest before except when I was in #StandingRock pic.twitter.com/CmkPdOf9Xv ‚ÄĒ Sara Sidner (@sarasidnerCNN) May 27, 2020 Watching a live stream of the protests in minneapolis.. Someones showed up on a horse. Its the most American thing I've ever seen, tear gas and rubber bullets and a guy on standing on a horse giving the cops the finger! pic.twitter.com/i3tOLD2EKN ‚ÄĒ FPL Topcat (@FplTopcat) May 27, 2020 ¬† Police forces across the country have also been riding horses to control crowds. A video posted on May 30 showed a mounted police officer trampling a female protester, prompting the Houston Police Department to announce that it is investigating the incident, and Mayor Sylvester Turner to apologize to the woman. Join the conversation about this story ¬Ľ NOW WATCH: Here's how these medical threads can help heal cystic acne scars

Continue Reading Some Black Lives Matter protesters have been riding horses to protests. Lil Nas X gave one of them props on Twitter.

Seattle protesters are using umbrellas to block pepper spray and tear gas, mirroring tactics used by the Hong Kong pro-democracy demonstrations

Seattle protesters are using umbrellas to shield themselves from substances like tear gas as they take part in the anti police-brutality protests that are sweeping the country. CNN reported that dozens of people opened umbrellas in front of a police barrier to protect themselves on Tuesday. Umbrellas may also be becoming a wider symbol of the protests in the city, after footage circulated of a police taking an umbrella off a woman before firing gas into a crowd on Monday. The use mirrors a protest tactic in Hong Kong, where pro-democracy demonstrators continue to use umbrellas to defend against tear gas. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Protesters in Seattle used umbrellas to shield themselves from control gasses like pepper spray and tear gas during police-brutality demonstrations on Tuesday, mirroring protest tactics used by Hong Kong's pro-democracy movement. CNN reported that dozens of people stood in front of a police barrier with umbrellas on Tuesday, to protect themselves against any chemicals police might use against them. Tuesday's protests were sparked by the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after a police officer knelt on him. Demonstrations against police brutality have since spread to as many as 14 American cities and around the world. ¬† Seattle looks a hell of a lot like Hong Kong did last July right now, pic.twitter.com/AOlQGUBsfy ‚ÄĒ Nathan Ruser (@Nrg8000) June 3, 2020 Micheal Spears, a reporter for Seattle news outlet KIRO 7 Seattle, tweeted that protesters on the front lines of the demonstration outside of the Seattle Police Department's East Precinct on Tuesday were opening umbrellas, and that the crowd was chanting "No more gas." More umbrellas going up at front of demonstration‚ÄĒ crowd chanting ‚Äúno more gas!‚ÄĚ #seattleprotests pic.twitter.com/9Pt2T5zLwB ‚ÄĒ Michael Spears (@MichaelKIRO7) June 3, 2020 The new symbol for Seattle protests? Bringing umbrellas to protests may also be a growing symbol in Seattle. Local news outlet My Northwest reported that people protesting on Tuesday had brought umbrellas in response to an incident on Monday, where protesters were met with gas after an officer grabbed a woman's umbrella away. An aerial video of a street on Seattle's Capitol Hill on Monday shows what appears to be peaceful protesters chanting: "We don't see no riot here, take off your riot gear," before the police begin to spray into the crowd. The Seattle Times reported that officers fired tear gas and pepper spray into the crowd. These protesters in Seattle are literally chanting ‚Äúwe don‚Äôt see no riot here, take off your riot gear‚ÄĚ & doing nothing else but standing peacefully when the police start throwing tear gas & firing into them pic.twitter.com/Bde3XQC27f ‚ÄĒ Hannah Jane Parkinson (@ladyhaja) June 2, 2020 Another view of the scene on Monday showed a close-up of an officer in riot gear pulling the pink umbrella over the barrier, and starting to spray into the crowd. The person filming the video says it is pepper spray: oh really? you want a link to the stream where the huge chunk prior to this moment was 100% peaceful? this is a POLICE RIOT.#seattleprotest#fuckthepolice#blacklivesmatter pic.twitter.com/zdNOAdzBvv ‚ÄĒ izaacmellow (@izaacmellow) June 2, 2020 A post in the Reddit group for Seattle on Tuesday urged people to being pink umbrellas to protests if they could as a "powerful symbol against what happened." The author also wrote: "We need the umbrellas for our protection while we are protesting." Seattle police declared the protest on Monday a riot. The force said the crowd threw rocks, bottles, and fireworks at officers, and tried to breach the barricade. The characterization was heavily disputed on social media, and many used the video footage as proof. Omari Salisbury, a citizen journalist who captured the close-up footage of the officer taking the woman's umbrella and who has been documenting the city's protests, told The Seattle Times that he saw no signs that the police had tried to de-escalate the situation before firing into the crowd. "I took in so much tear gas," he said. "I got hit with the pepper spray and the tear gas." Protest tactics from Hong Kong's playbook Umbrellas became a key symbol of pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong in 2014, which demanded free elections. They were used by protesters to shield themselves from tear gas and pepper spray, but became a wider symbol and led to the movement being known as the "Umbrella Movement." Bloomberg also noted that they became tools for privacy under China's heavy surveillance ‚ÄĒ and that police in Hong Kong at the time designated them as weapons and forbade residents from buying them online. Their use, both practical and symbolic, has continued, including in the 2019 protests that began in opposition to a now-shelved bill that would have allowed people in Hong Kong to be extradited to China, but developed into wider pro-democracy and anti-police-brutality protests. Protesters even got tattoos of the famous yellow umbrella protest symbol. Join the conversation about this story ¬Ľ NOW WATCH: We tried Clinique's color-changing BB gel on three different skin tones

Continue Reading Seattle protesters are using umbrellas to block pepper spray and tear gas, mirroring tactics used by the Hong Kong pro-democracy demonstrations

Eye Opener: Peaceful protesters defy curfews nationwide

An eighth night of protests saw mostly peaceful demonstrators defying city curfews across the country. Also, a protest in Paris over a death that has been compared to George Floyd's turned violent. All that and all that matters in today's Eye Opener. Your world in 90 seconds.

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Las Vegas cop on life support after gunshot to head at George Floyd protest

Las Vegas cop on life support after gunshot to head at George Floyd protest  New York Post Officer Shot -- LVMPD Sheriff discusses 2 Protest Shootings in Las Vegas  Las Vegas Metropolitan Police4 St. Louis police officers shot at George Floyd protests, still taking fire  Fox NewsSisolak orders National Guard to Las Vegas  Las Vegas Review-JournalLVMPD release new details on bloody night of protests  KTNV Channel 13 Las VegasView Full Coverage on Google News

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George W. Bush calls out racial injustices and celebrates protesters who ‚Äėmarch for a better future‚Äô

George W. Bush calls out racial injustices and celebrates protesters who ‚Äėmarch for a better future‚Äô¬†¬†The Washington PostView Full Coverage on Google News

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Do face masks really reduce coronavirus spread? Experts have mixed answers

For the first time, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended that even seemingly healthy people wear masks over their mouths and noses when venturing out of their homes into places where it is difficult to maintain distance from other people. But there is still major debate over how much masks ‚ÄĒ particularly the¬†homemade fabric masks¬†that the CDC recommends for the public ‚ÄĒ can slow¬†the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Continue Reading Do face masks really reduce coronavirus spread? Experts have mixed answers