NATO to Build Space Centre in Germany

NATO is making plans for a new space center in Ramstein, Germany. Euractiv reported: NATO defence ministers on Thursday (22 October) are expected to approve a plan to create a new space centre at the alliance’s Air Command in Ramstein, Germany, in response to growing concerns over protecting satellite and navigation assets from enemy interference. MORE: https://www.euractiv.com/section/defence-and-security/news/eyeing-extraterrestrial-threats-nato-to-set-up-new-space-centre-in-germany/

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Catalonia to invest in 'Catalan Nasa' space agency and satellites

As Catalonia faces the prospect of another coronavirus lockdown, the region’s government has announced it is investing €2.5m (£2.3m) to establish its own space agency and a further €18m in launching six communications satellites. The surprise announcement comes amid soaring Covid-19 infection rates and hospital admissions in the region, where health authorities are considering imposing a two-week lockdown. Bars and restaurants have been closed for 10 days and much of Catalonia’s vital hospitality sector is at a standstill. Jordi Puigneró, the Catalan digital policy minister, said on Tuesday that what he called the “Catalan Nasa” would “democratise space” and lead to the development of a service industry that “is still beyond imagination”. Puigneró rejected claims it was beyond the regional government’s legal competence to establish a space agency. He said Spain only controlled an area up to an altitude of 50km (31 miles), while the Catalan satellites will be 2,000km above the Earth. “Space is like international waters,” he said. Pedro Duque, Spain’s science minister and a former astronaut, has yet to comment on the proposal. Puigneró said the plan was for Catalonia to become a producer as well as a consumer of digital technology and predicted the agency’s work would create 1,200 jobs and an income of €300m within four years. The satellites are expected to be launched next year. He claimed there would be a return of €15 for every euro invested. The Catalan government says it needs the satellites to extend 5G cover, for observation and for its own services such as controlling forest fires. The news was greeted with disbelief on Twitter. “You are totally disconnected from reality,” one tweeter replied to Puigneró. “This already exists for free at a European level and it’s called Copernicus.” Another commented: “The Catalan republic conquers space in the midst of a pandemic, in a crisis of poverty, unemployment and recession.” The nano-satellites weigh only a few kilos and cost between €500,000 and €2m to manufacture. They operate at a lower altitude than conventional, geostationary satellites and as a result have a useful life of only about four years before gravity pulls them back down to Earth.

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What in the world is this?Mysterious lights in the night sky baffle Hawaii residents

Mysterious lights in night sky baffle Hawaii residents. ‘What in the world is this?’. Picture: Youtube video Did you happen to see the strange, bright lights on Saturday night?You may have been one of many who thought it looked like a plane, a meteor shower, or something unexplainable. People on different islands reported that they saw these lights in the sky on Saturday night, Oct. 24, shortly after 10 p.m. We’re told since it was traveling east. Residents on the Big Island and Maui probably got a better view. [embedded content] If you like us, please use this link for Amazon purchases “I started videotaping and when they got closer, I start freaking out because I’m like, ‘Oh, what in the world is this?” said Molokai resident Kuuip Kanawaliwali. “We actually didn’t even know what to think. We didn’t know what it was, where it came from,” said Sheri English who also lives on Molokai. “It just appeared. It was actually very eerie, eerie feeling.” That was probably what many thought when they saw these mysterious bright lights in the night sky. But experts from the Mauna Kea observatories offer a simple explanation of what they suspect. “So in all likelihood, what they saw last night was the reentry of a rocket booster that was from a rocket that was launched in 2008. So a Chinese rocket that was boosting up a communication satellite for Venezuela,” said Chief Scientist John O’Meara of the W. M. Keck Observatory. [embedded content] It’s likely as the years went by, the orbit of the booster eventually decayed. Astronomers found a map of the object’s flight path which was near the Hawaiian Islands. The map also provides information predicting when the rocket booster would reenter. “So we can’t be 100% certain because we don’t have any of the pieces of the debris. But the pattern of the lights that we saw in our timelapse combined with this map,” said Canada France Hawaii Telescope Strategic Communications Director Mary Beth Laychak. “This flight path and the precision at which all of these companies are able to estimate where their objects will enter and how they’ll break up is what really leads us to believe that this was this Venesat-1 reentering the atmosphere.” We’re told that this is not a rare occurrence because objects get launched into space all the time. But to catch a glimpse of it means you had to be in the right place at the right time–right in the flight path. When it hits the atmosphere, prepare for a light show. “It starts to break apart and heats up and gets really hot. And when it gets really hot, it gets really bright and falls apart,” said O’Meara. “The entire object that’s breaking apart over our atmosphere is traveling in the exact same orbital path. So we would expect to see all of that debris follow in a straight line,” said Laychak. To see the timelapse, from the Canada France Hawaii Telescope, click here. More mysterious lights and UFO news on KHON2, Strange Sounds and Steve Quayle. Follow us: Facebook and Twitter. By the way you can also support us on Paypal. Please and thank you!

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NASA Confirms Water Exists on Sunny Side of the Moon

U.S space agency NASA confirmed Monday that water exists on the sunny side of the Moon, albeit in very small amounts. According to a new study in the journal Nature Astronomy, water can persist on the sunlit side of the Moon, noting that future explorers may have new opportunities. “This discovery reveals that water might be distributed across the lunar surface and not limited to the cold, shadowed places near the lunar poles, where we have previously discovered water ice,” NASA’s Paul Hertz said at a press conference. In a news release, he noted that NASA scientists had some indications that water could exist on the Moon’s sunlit side. But Hertz added that “now we know it is there,” and “this discovery challenges our understanding of the lunar surface and raises intriguing questions about resources relevant for deep space exploration.” NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) found water molecules in the Clavius Crater, which is visible from Earth, said NASA in the release. “Prior to the SOFIA observations, we knew there was some kind of hydration,” Casey Honniball, the lead author who published the results from her graduate thesis work at the University of Hawaii at Manoa in Honolulu, said on Monday in the news release. “But we didn’t know how much, if any, was actually water molecules—like we drink every day—or something more like drain cleaner.” According to the agency, the amount of water on the Moon is minuscule, noting that the Sahara Desert in North Africa has about 100 times the amount than what SOFIA found in the lunar soil. But NASA’s “discovery raises new questions about how water is created and how it persists on the harsh, airless lunar surface,” it noted. NASA researchers said they’re aiming to learn more about the presence of water on the Moon during the planned Artemis program, which will send people to the Moon’s surface in 2024. SOFIA will attempt to observe water in additional sunny areas on the Moon to see how the life-sustaining substance is produced, stored, and moves across the lunar surface, said researchers. “It was, in fact, the first time SOFIA has looked at the Moon, and we weren’t even completely sure if we would get reliable data, but questions about the Moon’s water compelled us to try,” Naseem Rangwala, SOFIA’s project scientist at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, said in the release. “It’s incredible that this discovery came out of what was essentially a test, and now that we know we can do this, we’re planning more flights to do more observations.”

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Water exists on the moon, scientists confirm

Scientists have gathered some of the most compelling evidence yet for the existence of water on the moon – and it may be relatively accessible. The discovery has implications for future missions to the moon and deeper space exploration.With no significant atmosphere insulating it from the sun’s rays, it had been assumed that the moon’s surface was dry – until the 1990s, when orbiting spacecraft found indications of ice in large and inaccessible craters near the moon’s poles.Then in 2009, imaging spectrometers onboard India’s Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft recorded signatures consistent with water in light reflecting off the moon’s surface. Even so, technical limitations meant it was impossible to know if this really was H2O (water) or hydroxyl molecules (consisting of one oxygen atom and one hydrogen atom) in minerals.Now, Casey Honniball at Nasa’s ASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland, US, and colleagues have detected a chemical signature that is unambiguously H2O, by measuring the wavelengths of sunlight reflecting off the moon’s surface. The data was gathered by the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (Sofia), a modified Boeing 747 carrying a 2.7-metre reflecting telescope.The water was discovered at high latitudes towards the moon’s south pole in abundances of about 100 to 400 parts per million H2O. “That is quite a lot,” said Mahesh Anand, professor of planetary science and exploration at the Open University in Milton Keynes. “It is about as much as is dissolved in the lava flowing out of the Earth’s mid-ocean ridges, which could be harvested to make liquid water under the right temperature and pressure conditions.” The existence of water has implications for future lunar missions, because it could be treated and used for drinking; separated into hydrogen and oxygen for use as a rocket propellant; and the oxygen could be used for breathing. “Water is a very expensive commodity in space,” said Anand.However, harvesting it from dark, steep-walled craters where the temperature rarely climbs above -230C – which is where the bulk of any frozen water was assumed to lie – would be a perilous undertaking.“If it turns out that there is a lot of water in these non-permanently shadowed areas, then that is potentially a very large area, and it is accessible because it is in sunlight,” said Ian Crawford, professor of planetary science and astrobiology at Birkbeck, University of London.Questions remain, however. One is the form in which the water exists. One possibility is that it is dissolved within lunar “glass”, created when meteorites hit the moon’s surface. Alternatively, tiny ice crystals could be distributed between grains of lunar soil. The latter would be far easier to extract, said Anand.Another is how deep this newly confirmed water source extends. If it were restricted to the uppermost few microns or millimetres, then its practical significance would be minimal – although it would still beg interesting scientific questions about how it got there, Prof Crawford said.The only real way to find out is to go to the moon, and start drilling. This may not be far off. Nasa’s Artemis mission plans to send a male and female astronaut to the moon by 2024. British scientists are also developing a robotic drill to take samples of lunar soil from depths of up to a metre, as part of a Russian mission scheduled for 2025.But where should they dig? Permanently shadowed areas would still be the best bet, because water would be more protected from the sun’s rays there. Another paper in Nature Astronomy suggests that these areas may be more numerous and accessible than previously assumed.Using images from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Paul Hayne, of the University of Colorado in Boulder, and colleagues mapped the distribution of smaller craters and areas of rough ground, and calculated that approximately 40,000 km2 of the lunar surface has the capacity to trap water. Although this still only represents 0.15% of the lunar surface, their existence may also reduce the risk of conflict between moon-faring nations.“With billions of potential water reservoirs scattered over the polar regions, the focus should be shifted away from the handful of well-known large craters and towards the multitude of potential landing sites our study reveals,” Prof Hayne said.Earlier in October, eight countries including the UK signed the Artemis Accords, a set of international agreements drawn up by the US, governing future exploration of the moon and exploitation of its resources.“The accords pull together the existing norms of behaviour that we’ve established, such as recognition that exploration of the moon should be for peaceful purposes, that there should be transparency in operations, and data sharing, and so on,” said Christopher Newman, professor of space law and policy at Northumbria University, in Newcastle. Other signatories are expected, but Russia is hesitant and China is prevented from signing because of ongoing trade disputes with the US.

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New fast radio bursts from inside the Milky Way may solve more than one major cosmic mystery

New fast radio bursts from inside the Milky Way may solve more than one major cosmic mystery. Picture: Sophia Dagnello, NRAO/AUI/NSF A little dead star that dazzled us earlier this year is not done with its shenanigans.Magnetar SGR 1935+2154, which in April emitted the first known fast radio burst from inside the Milky Way, has flared up once more, giving astronomers yet another chance to solve more than one major cosmic mystery. On 8 October 2020, the CHIME/FRB collaboration detected SGR 1935+2154 emitting three millisecond radio bursts in three seconds. Following up on the CHIME/FRB detection, the FAST radio telescope found something else – a pulsed radio emission consistent with the magnetar’s spin period. “It’s really exciting to see SGR 1935+2154 back again, and I’m optimistic that as we study these bursts more carefully, it will help us better understand the potential relationship between magnetars and fast radio bursts,” astronomer Deborah Good of the University of British Columbia in Canada, and member of the CHIME/FRB, told ScienceAlert. The detections, reported in The Astronomer’s Telegram, are currently undergoing analysis. Before April of this year, fast radio bursts (FRBs) had only ever been detected coming from outside the galaxy, usually from sources millions of light-years away. The first one was discovered in 2007, and ever since, astronomers have been trying to figure out what causes them. As the name implies, FRBs are bursts of extremely powerful radio waves detected in the sky, some discharging more energy than hundreds of millions of Suns. They last mere milliseconds. Because most fast radio burst sources seem to flare once and haven’t been detected repeating, they’re extremely unpredictable. In addition, the ones we’ve detected usually come from so far away, our telescopes are unable to pick out individual stars. Both of these characteristics make FRBs challenging to track down either to an exact source galaxy, or a known cause. But SGR 1935+2154 is only around 30,000 light-years away. On 28 April 2020, it spat out a powerful millisecond-duration burst, which has since been named FRB 200428 in keeping with fast radio burst naming conventions. Once the power of the signal was corrected for distance, FRB 200428 was found to be not quite as powerful as extragalactic fast radio bursts – but everything else about it fit the profile. “If the same signal came from a nearby galaxy, like one of the nearby typical FRB galaxies, it would look like an FRB to us,” astronomer Shrinivas Kulkarni of Caltech told ScienceAlert in May. “Something like this has never been seen before.“ We don’t know much about the three new bursts yet. Because scientists are still working on the data, it’s possible that some early conclusions are likely to change, Good told ScienceAlert. But we can already tell that they are both like and unlike FRB 200428. They are a little less powerful again, but they are all still incredibly strong, and all just milliseconds long. “Although less bright than the detection earlier this year, these are still very bright bursts which we’d see if they were extragalactic,” Good said. “One of the most interesting aspects of this detection is that our three bursts seem to have occurred within one rotation period. The magnetar is known to rotate once every ~3.24 seconds, but our first and second bursts were separated by 0.954 seconds, and the second and third were separated by 1.949 seconds. That’s a bit unusual, and I think it’s something that we’ll be looking into further going forward.“ That could reveal something new and useful about magnetar behaviour, because – let’s face it – they are pretty weird. Magnetars – of which we have only confirmed 24 to date – are a type of neutron star; that’s the collapsed core of a dead star not massive enough to turn into a black hole. Neutron stars are small and dense, about 20 kilometres (12 miles) in diameter, with a maximum mass of about two Suns. But magnetars add something else to the mix: a shockingly powerful magnetic field. These jaw-dropping fields are around a quadrillion times more powerful than Earth’s magnetic field, and a thousand times more powerful than that of a normal neutron star. And we still don’t fully understand how they got that way. But we do know that magnetars undergo periods of activity. As gravity tries to keep the star together – an inward force – the magnetic field, pulling outward, is so powerful, it distorts the star’s shape. This leads to ongoing tension which occasionally produces gargantuan starquakes and giant magnetar flares. SGR 1935+2154 has been undergoing such activity, suggesting a link between magnetar tantrums and at least some FRBs. Obviously, astronomers have found the source of the first intra-galactic FRB to be of intense interest. When CHIME/FRB reported their detection, other astronomers went to have a look at the star, including a team led by Zhu Weiwei of the National Astronomical Observatories of China who had access to FAST, the largest single-aperture radio telescope in the world. And they found something interesting, also reported in The Astronomer’s Telegram – pulsed radio emission. These radio pulses were nowhere near as strong as the bursts, but they’re extremely rare: If validated, SGR 1935+2154 will only be the sixth magnetar with pulsed radio emission. And the pulse period was found to be 3.24781 seconds – almost exactly the star’s spin period. This is curious, because so far, astronomers have struggled to find a link between magnetars and radio pulsars. Pulsars are another type of neutron star; they have a more normal magnetic field, but they pulse in radio waves as they spin, and astronomers have long tried to figure out how the two types of stars are related. Earlier this year, Australian astronomers identified a magnetar that was behaving like a radio pulsar – a possible “missing link” between the two, and evidence that at least some magnetars could evolve into pulsars. SGR 1935+2154 could be another piece of the puzzle. “Based on these results and the increasing bursting activities, we speculate that the magnetar may be in the process of turning into an active radio pulsar,” Weiwei’s team wrote. What an absolutely bloody fascinating little star this is turning out to be. Recently the Breakthrough Listen project (that seeks to find extra-terrestrial life) released a group of 9 FRB (Fast Radio Burst) recordings from a dwarf galaxy 3 billion light years away. This video shows a couple of those recordings combined, and slowed down significantly to examine what might be in them. [embedded content] This article was originally published by ScienceAlert. Read the original article here. More space mystery and sounds on Strange Sounds and Steve Quayle. Follow us: Facebook and Twitter. By the way you can also support us on Paypal. Please and thank you!

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Overstuffed Nasa spacecraft Osiris-Rex losing particles after bingeing on Bennu

A Nasa spacecraft is stuffed with so much asteroid rubble from this week’s grab that it’s jammed open and precious particles are drifting away in space, scientists said on Friday. Scientists announced the news three days after the spacecraft named Osiris-Rex briefly touched asteroid Bennu 200m miles away. The mission’s lead scientist, Dante Lauretta, said Tuesday’s operation collected far more material than expected for return to Earth – in the hundreds of grams. The sample container on the end of the robot arm penetrated so deeply into the asteroid and with such force, however, that rocks got sucked in and became wedged around the rim of the lid. The team was scrambling to put the sample container into the return capsule as early as Tuesday – much sooner than originally planned – for the long trip home. Particles are continuing to escape, and scientists want to minimize the loss. “Time is of the essence,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, chief of Nasa’s science missions. A cloud of asteroid particles could be seen swirling around the spacecraft as it backed away from Bennu – at least one-half of an ounce (5 to 10 grams) at any one time. The situation appeared to stabilize, according to Lauretta, once the robot arm stopped moving and was locked into place. The requirement for Orisis-Rex – Nasa’s first asteroid sample return mission, totaling more than $800m – was at least 2 ounces (60 grams) of samples for return. The carbon-rich material holds the preserved building blocks of our solar system and could help scientists better understand how the planets were formed and how life originated on Earth. Launched in 2016, the spacecraft arrived at Bennu in 2018. Regardless of what’s on board, it will still leave the vicinity of the asteroid in March. The samples won’t return to Earth until 2023. Japan is awaiting its second batch of samples taken from a different asteroid, due back in December.

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NASA awards Nokia to deploy cellular network (4G, 5G) on the moon

Nokia wins NASA contract to put a 4G network on the moon. Picture via Youtube video Soon, astronauts on moon missions won’t have any excuse for not answering their texts.NASA has awarded Nokia of America $14.1 million to deploy a cellular network on the moon. The freaking moon. The grant is part of $370 million worth of contracts signed under NASA’s “Tipping Point” selections, meant to advance research and development for space exploration. [embedded content] Nokia’s plan is to build a 4G/LTE network, and eventually transition to 5G (just like the rest of us). It will be “the first LTE/4G communications system in space,” according to NASA’s announcement. “The system could support lunar surface communications at greater distances, increased speeds, and provide more reliability than current standards,” the announcement also reads. Nokia’s research arm, Bell Labs, provided more details in a Twitter thread. The company intends for the network to support wireless operation of lunar rovers and navigation, as well as streaming video. To the moon! 🌕We are excited to have been named by @NASA as a key partner to advance “Tipping Point” technologies for the moon, to help pave the way towards sustainable human presence on the lunar surface.So, what technology can you expect to see? (1/6) pic.twitter.com/wDNwloyHdP — Bell Labs (@BellLabs) October 15, 2020 The network is built to be compact and efficient, as well as “specially designed to withstand the extreme temperature, radiation and vacuum conditions of space.“ According to UPI, NASA said in a live broadcast of the announcement that the network would extend to spacecraft, and help develop technology fit for the moon. While there aren’t details about the timeline of this project becoming a reality, it’s all in support of NASA’s goal of having a lunar base on the moon by 2028, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said in the broadcast. After all, how else would the astronauts be able to Instagram their moon walks?! More strange space science news on NASA, Mashable, Strange Sounds and Steve Quayle. Follow us: Facebook and Twitter. By the way you can also support us on Paypal. Please and thank you!

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US Spacecraft Touches Asteroid Surface for Rare Rubble Grab

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.—A NASA spacecraft descended to an asteroid Tuesday and, dodging boulders the size of buildings, momentarily touched the surface to collect a handful of cosmic rubble for return to Earth. It was a first for the United States—only Japan has scored asteroid samples. “Touchdown declared,” a flight controller announced to cheers and applause. “Sampling is in progress.” Confirmation came from the Osiris-Rex spacecraft as it made contact with the surface of the asteroid Bennu more than 200 million miles away. But it could be a week before scientists know how much, if much of anything, was grabbed and whether another try will be needed. If successful, Osiris-Rex will return the samples in 2023. “I can’t believe we actually pulled this off,” said lead scientist Dante Lauretta of the University of Arizona. “The spacecraft did everything it was supposed to do.” Osiris-Rex took 4 1/2 hours to make its way down from its tight orbit around Bennu, following commands sent well in advance by ground controllers near Denver. Bennu’s gravity was too low for the spacecraft to land — the asteroid is just 1,670 feet across. As a result, it had to reach out with its 11-foot robot arm and attempt to grab at least 2 ounces of Bennu. The ancient asteroid, OSIRIS-REx will attempt to descend to the treacherous, boulder-packed surface and snatch a handful of rubble on Oct. 20, 2020. (NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona via AP) The University of Arizona’s Heather Enos, deputy scientist for the mission, described it as “kissing the surface with a short touch-and-go measured in just seconds.” At Mission Control for spacecraft builder Lockheed Martin, controllers on the TAG team—for touch-and-go—wore royal blue polo shirts and black masks with the mission patch. The coronavirus pandemic had resulted in a two-month delay. Tuesday’s operation was considered the most harrowing part of the mission, which began with a launch from Cape Canaveral back in 2016. A van-sized spacecraft with an Egyptian-inspired name, Osiris-Rex aimed for a spot equivalent to a few parking spaces on Earth in the middle of the asteroid’s Nightingale Crater. After nearly two years orbiting the boulder-packed Bennu, the spacecraft found this location to have the biggest patch of particles small enough to be swallowed up. After determining that the coast was clear, Osiris-Rex closed in the final few yards for the sampling. The spacecraft was programmed to shoot out pressurized nitrogen gas to stir up the surface, then suck up any loose pebbles or dust, before backing away. By the time flight controllers heard back from Osiris-Rex, the action already happened 18 1/2 minutes earlier, the time it takes radio signals to travel each way between Bennu and Earth. They expected to start receiving photos overnight and planned to provide an update Wednesday. “We’re going to be looking at a whole series of images as we descended down to the surface, made contact, fired that gas bottle, and I really want to know how that surface responded,” Lauretta said. “We haven’t done this before, so this is new territory for us.” Scientists want at least 2 ounces and, ideally, closer to 4 pounds of Bennu’s black, crumbly, carbon-rich material—thought to contain the building blocks of our solar system. Pictures taken during the operation will give team members a general idea of the amount of loot; they will put the spacecraft through a series of spins Saturday for a more accurate measure. This undated image made available by NASA shows the asteroid Bennu from the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft. (NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona/CSA/York/MDA via AP) NASA’s science mission chief, Thomas Zurbuchen, likened Bennu to the Rosetta Stone: “something that’s out there and tells the history of our entire Earth, of the solar system, during the last billions of years.” Another benefit: The solar-orbiting Bennu, which swings by Earth every six years, has a slight chance of smacking Earth late in the next century. It won’t be a show-stopping life-ender. But the more scientists know about the paths and properties of potentially hazardous space rocks like this one, the safer we’ll all be. Osiris-Rex could make two more touch-and-go maneuvers if Tuesday’s sample comes up short. Regardless of how many tries it takes, the samples won’t return to Earth until 2023 to close out the $800-plus million quest. The sample capsule will parachute into the Utah desert. “That will be another big day for us. But this is absolutely the major event of the mission right now,” NASA scientist Lucy Lim said. Japan expects samples from its second asteroid mission—in the milligrams at most—to land in the Australian desert in December. NASA, meanwhile, plans to launch three more asteroid missions in the next two years, all one-way trips. By Marcia Dunn

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Nasa Osiris-Rex spacecraft lands on asteroid Bennu in mission to collect dust

A Nasa spacecraft has successfully landed on an asteroid, dodging boulders the size of buildings, in order to collect a handful of cosmic rubble for analysis back on Earth.The space agency team behind the Osiris-Rex project said preliminary data showed the sample collection went as planned and that the spacecraft had lifted off the surface of asteroid Bennu.“I can’t believe we actually pulled this off,” said lead scientist Dante Lauretta of the University of Arizona. “The spacecraft did everything it was supposed to do.”Nasa administrator Jim Bridenstine offered his congratulations, saying: “We are on the way to returning the largest sample brought home from space since Apollo. If all goes well, this sample will be studied by scientists for generations to come.”The Osiris-Rex spacecraft sent back confirmation of its brief contact with asteroid Bennu more than 200m miles (322m km) away, drawing cheers from the mission team. But it could be a week before scientists know how much, if anything, was grabbed and whether another try will be needed. If successful, Osiris-Rex will return the samples in 2023.The US mission follows one run by Japan called Hayabusa2, which is due to return to Earth in December bearing samples collected from the 4.5bn-year-old asteroid Ryugu. When it lands in the Australian desert, it will be the first ever sub-surface asteroid sample to return to Earth.On Bennu, the Osiris-Rex spacecraft took four-and-a-half hours to make its way down from its tight orbit to the surface, following commands sent well in advance by ground controllers near Denver.

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Elon Musk’s SpaceX Granted a Licence to Provide Satellite Internet to Rural Canada

Canada’s telecommunications regulator has given Elon Musk’s Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) a licence allowing the company to provide satellite internet service to rural Canadians. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission sent a letter to SpaceX’s chief financial officer Bret Johnson informing him it has approved the company’s application for the Basic International Telecommunications Services (BITS) licence. The BITS licence would authorize SpaceX to provide international telecommunications services between Canada and other countries. The CRTC said it has received and reviewed 2,585 comments regarding SpaceX’s BITS application since the company filed it on May 15. The majority of the comments came from Canadians residing in remote parts of the country, according to CBC News. The BITS licence will enable SpaceX to bring its Starlink Program to rural Canadians. The program aims to “deliver high speed broadband internet to locations where access has been unreliable, expensive, or completely unavailable” through a constellation of low-Earth orbit satellites. It is unclear when the internet service will be available in rural areas. Starlink currently targets markets in northern United States and Canada, and is looking to expand to global coverage in 2021. Musk, the founder and CEO of SpaceX, has said beta tests are already underway. “Once these satellites reach their target position, we will be able to roll out a fairly wide public beta in northern US & hopefully southern Canada,” he said in a Twitter post on Oct. 6. SpaceX has been consecutively launching batches of Starlink satellites since May 2019, with plans to ultimately build an interconnected network of 12,000 satellites. Concerns have been raised that Starlink and similar megaconstellation initiatives engender space debris and light pollution, which can significantly interfere with space observations. The United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs and the International Astronomical Union opened a four-day online workshop titled Dark and Quiet Skies for Science and Society on Oct. 8, hoping to raise public awareness about the issue. In an interview with Space.com, an attendee at the event said the long-term goal is to convince the U.N. to “issue guidelines about protecting the night sky that will reflect a reasonable compromise between the satellite operators and the needs of astronomers.” Musk has responded to these concerns on multiple occasions, noting that SpaceX has been doing experiments to reduce sunlight reflected from the satellites. “It will be increasingly difficult to see Starlink satellites, as we’re actively working with the astronomer community to ensure that even the most sensitive telescopes are fine & scientific progress is not impeded,” he said in a tweet on Oct. 2. The latest launch mission, hauling a full stack of 60 satellites, took place on Oct. 18 at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, which brings the total number of Starlink satellites in orbit to 835.

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Talking on the moon: Nasa and Nokia to install 4G on lunar surface

With competition among Earth’s telecoms providers as fierce as ever, equipment maker Nokia has announced its expansion into a new market, winning a deal to install the first cellular network on the moon.The Finnish equipment manufacturer said it was selected by Nasa to deploy an “ultra-compact, low-power, space-hardened” wireless 4G network on the lunar surface, as part of the US space agency’s plan to establish a long-term human presence on the moon by 2030.The $14.1m contract, awarded to Nokia’s US subsidiary, is part of Nasa’s Artemis programme which aims to send the first woman, and next man, to the moon by 2024.The astronauts will begin carrying out detailed experiments and explorations which the agency hopes will help it develop its first human mission to Mars.Nokia’s network equipment will be installed remotely on the moon’s surface using a lunar hopper built by Intuitive Machines in late 2022, Nokia said.“The network will self-configure upon deployment,” the firm said in a statement, adding that the wireless technology will allow for “vital command and control functions, remote control of lunar rovers, real-time navigation and streaming of high definition video.”The 4G equipment can be updated to a super-fast 5G network in the future, Nokia said.In all, Nasa announced last week it would distribute $370m to 14 companies to supply “Tipping Point” technologies for its mission, which include robotics and new methods of harvesting the resources required for living on the moon, such as oxygen and energy sources.The bulk of the funding went to companies researching cryogenic propellants, freezing liquids used to fuel spacecraft.Among them, Elon Musk’s SpaceX received $53.2m for a demonstration of the transferring of ten metric tons of liquid oxygen between tanks on a starship vehicle, Nasa said.

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Pair of solar flares create shortwave radio brownouts over South America

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Linkedin ReddIt WhatsApp Departing active region AR2775 unleashed a pair of C-class solar flares on Oct. 16th. The strongest (C3.5) propelled a cloud of plasma into space. A solar flare was expelled from the sun on October 16 2020. Picture: SpaceWeather It will not hit Earth. UV radiation from the flares briefly ionized the top of Earth’s atmosphere, causing minor shortwave radio brownouts over South America. Minor brownout over South America after solar flare on October 16, 2020. Picture: SpaceWeather More solar storm news on SpaceWeather, Strange Sounds and Steve Quayle. Now if you are looking for supplements to increase your healthy lifestyle please visit Natural Health Source. Follow us: Facebook and Twitter. By the way you can also support us on Paypal. Please and thank you! Facebook Twitter Pinterest Linkedin ReddIt WhatsApp Previous articleKrakatoa is still active, and we are not ready for the tsunamis another eruption would generate Follow Strange Sounds to discover amazing, weird and unexpected phenomena around the world. Be curious!

Continue Reading Pair of solar flares create shortwave radio brownouts over South America

Asteroid hunters spot flurry of new space rocks headed towards Earth after identifying mysterious new ‘minimoon’

There are tons of asteroids orbiting around Earth. Imagine seeing this one barrelling down on us. Artist’s impression of the dead comet 2015 TB145, also known as the “Death Comet”. Picture: José Antonio Peñas/SINC NASA is warning of yet another five asteroids headed our way in the first half of this week, as the agency’s leading asteroid expert claims to have solved the mystery of the ‘minimoon’ set to enter earth’s orbit.Amid a flurry of asteroidal activity as we enter the final few months of 2020, NASA’s asteroid hunters have flagged five more space rocks en route ranging in size from 5.5m all the way up to a whopping 45m.  On October 12, two asteroids spotted in the past four days, are due to fly past: the 5.5-meter 2020 TS1 will pass closer to us than the moon, at just 225,000 km, followed shortly after by the 12-meter 2020 TR1 which will swing further out at 1.2 million km. For reference, the moon orbits the Earth at an average distance of 385,000 kilometers.   On Tuesday, 2018 GD2, measuring 4.5 meters in diameter or roughly half the length of a London bus, will shoot past at 6.2 million km.  Next, on October 14, asteroid 2020 TD, which has a diameter half as long as the Statue of Liberty is tall (45m) will pass at a distance of 7.2 million km. Bringing up the rear will be the 17-meter 2020 TO2 which was spotted just two days ago and will pass us at a range of 1.2 million km.  Meanwhile, NASA’s top asteroid hunter Paul Chodas thinks he has identified the mysterious object which is soon due to take up orbit around the Earth, becoming the planet’s newest ‘minimoon.’  Named “asteroid 2020 SO” Chodas suspects it is actually a remnant from a failed moon-landing mission 54 years ago, confirming the suspicions of many in the astronomical community.  “I’m pretty jazzed about this,“ Chodas said. “It’s been a hobby of mine to find one of these and draw such a link, and I’ve been doing it for decades now.“ Chodas believes the object is actually the Centaur upper rocket stage from the NASA Surveyor 2 mission in 1966. Its lander crashed into the moon after one of its thrusters failed to ignite in time.  2020 SO was recently spotted by telescopes based in Hawaii and added to the International Astronomical Union’s Minor Planet Center’s list of asteroids and comets in the solar system, of which there are almost one million.  The object is roughly eight meters long, which is a close enough match to the size of the old Centaur which would be under 10 meters including its engine nozzle.  Chodas noticed the object’s orbit and plane had more in common with the Earth than with other asteroids in the solar system and also cited the object’s relatively slow approach speed of just 2,400 kph (slow by asteroid standards) as evidence that it is more likely to be space junk than a space rock. “I could be wrong on this. I don’t want to appear overly confident,“ Chodas said. “But it’s the first time, in my view, that all the pieces fit together with an actual known launch.“ More asteroid news on RT, Strange Sounds and Steve Quayle. Now if you are looking for supplements to increase your healthy lifestyle please visit Natural Health Source. Follow us: Facebook and Twitter. By the way you can also support us on Paypal. Please and thank you!

Continue Reading Asteroid hunters spot flurry of new space rocks headed towards Earth after identifying mysterious new ‘minimoon’

A huge solar flare burst from the Sun and just missed Earth… Now look at the video and feel how lucky we are

A bright coronal mass ejection (CME) lumbered away from the Sun on Oct. 6th, captured in a movie from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). NOAA forecasters say the CME will miss Earth. However, if this same explosion had happened just one week ago when the blast site was facing Earth, we would now be declaring a geomagnetic storm warning. Maybe next time! [embedded content] The Sun is constantly bubbling and erupting, releasing huge solar flares into space and when it does, it releases a barrage of solar particles into the cosmos. NASA has just released a video of a massive solar flare, which if it had been released earlier, the bombardment of solar particles would have been on a collision course with Earth. Thankfully this time, the solar flare will miss Earth, but had it been a few days earlier our planet would be right in the crosshairs. Astronomy site Space Weather said: “If only this had happened one week ago. “A beautifully bright coronal mass ejection (CME) lumbered away from the Sun on October 6.“NOAA forecasters say the CME will miss Earth. However, if this same explosion had happened just one week ago when the blast site was facing Earth, we would now be declaring a geomagnetic storm warning.“ Video: A huge solar sorm on October 6, 2020. Picture via Youtube video Major solar flares are dangerous For the most part, solar flares are relatively harmless. On a normal occasion, a solar flare is responsible for auroras seen here on Earth. This is because the magnetosphere deflects the particles from the Sun, leading to the blue and green lights in the northern and southern poles. However, on occasion, solar flares can be so powerful that they pose a threat to Earth’s technology.As solar particles bombard the atmosphere, it can cause the magnetosphere to expand.As such, it makes it much more difficult for satellite communications to penetrate the atmosphere, damaging technologies such as mobile phones, satellite television and GPS.A huge solar flare can also cause a surge in the national grid, causing power outages.Rarely does an event such as this happen, with the biggest technology-crippling solar storm coming in 1859, when a surge in electricity during what is now known as the Carrington Event, was so strong that telegraph systems went down across Europe.There are also reports that some buildings set on fire as a result of the electrical surge. However, another major solar storm could occur, which has led researchers to urge policy makers to invest in better infrastructure to observe our host star. A recent study from the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Russia, said: “A major solar storm could shut down electricity, television broadcasts, the internet, and radio communications, leading to significant cascading effects in many areas of life.“According to some experts, the damage from such an extreme event could cost up to several trillion dollars and the restoration of infrastructure and the economy could take up to 10 years. “Thus, understanding and forecasting the most hazardous extreme events is of prime importance for the protection of society and technology against the global hazards of space weather.“ More information on this latest solar storm on Express, Strange Sounds and Steve Quayle. Now if you are looking for supplements to increase your healthy lifestyle please visit Natural Health Source. Follow us: Facebook and Twitter. By the way you can also support us on Paypal. Please and thank you!

Continue Reading A huge solar flare burst from the Sun and just missed Earth… Now look at the video and feel how lucky we are

Watch a rare Earth-grazer space rock skipping through the atmosphere and bouncing right back out again

Earth-grazer space rock video. Picture: Global Meteor Network The Earth is constantly in the line of fire from space rocks. Some pass us by, some crash through the atmosphere and burn up as bright fireballs soaring across the night sky.Sometimes, however, they are just brief visitors, skipping through the atmosphere and bouncing right back out again. These are known as “Earth-grazers”, and it’s rare to catch one in the act. This little meteoroid was picked up by the Global Meteor Network in the early hours of the morning of September 22, above northern Germany and the Netherlands. According to the European Space Agency (ESA), it got as low as 91 kilometers (56.5 miles) in altitude before bouncing back into space.   Earth-grazers only occur a handful of times a year, compared to the thousands of meteors we see, which occasionally land on Earth. So, what is the difference between a meteoroid, meteor, and meteorite? A meteoroid is a fragment of space rock – a comet or asteroid – that becomes a meteor (shooting star) when it burns up in our atmosphere and disintegrates, the pieces of which only become meteorites if they land on the ground. Although thousands of meteorites have been discovered, only 40 have ever been traced back to their parent body, according to ESA. The meteoroid entered Earth’s atmosphere traveling at 34.1 km/s before bouncing back. GIF: Global Meteor Network; D. Vida, P. Roggemans, J. Dörr, M. Breukers, E. Harkink, K. Jobse, K. Habraken The present earthgrazer This one didn’t get low enough to burn up, managing to somehow escape and whizz back out into space. It entered the atmosphere at 3.53am UTC on September 22 traveling at 34.1 km/s (21 m/s). Incredibly, the meteoroid was traced back to a Jupiter-family orbit, but searches for the parent body have not proven fruitful yet. (1/2) An earthgrazer above N Germany and the Netherlands was observed by 8 #globalmeteornetwork cameras on Sept 22, 03:53:35 UTC. It entered the atmosphere at 34.1 km/s, reached the lowest altitude of ~91 km and bounced back into space!@westernuScience @IMOmeteors @amsmeteors pic.twitter.com/5EgRivdcsu — Denis Vida (@meteordoc) September 22, 2020 So how does a meteoroid “bounce” off Earth’s atmosphere rather than being sucked in? First, it has to enter the atmosphere at a shallow angle, like a stone skimming water. It also has to keep its speed to be able to escape Earth’s gravity; Earth’s escape velocity is 11.2 km/s (7 m/s), which the meteoroid was going comfortably faster.   Earth-grazer’s risks and threats Just because they don’t touch the ground, however, doesn’t mean Earth-grazers are completely harmless. The Tunguska event of June 30, 1908 – when a massive explosion flattened 2,150 square kilometers (830 square miles) of Siberian forest, with tremors felt as far away as the UK and US – is believed to have released 30 megatons of energy, enough to level a city. It was thought to have been caused by the largest asteroid impact in recorded history. However, due to the absence of an impact crater, theories suggested the asteroid disintegrated when it entered the atmosphere and a shockwave caused the event. New research released earlier this year suggests the space body was in fact an Earth-grazer, hitting the atmosphere, causing the shockwave, and skimming right back out again, hence no impact crater.  More earth-grazer space rocks information on ESA, IFL Science, Strange Sounds and Steve Quayle. Follow us: Facebook and Twitter. By the way you can also support us on Paypal. Please and thank you!

Continue Reading Watch a rare Earth-grazer space rock skipping through the atmosphere and bouncing right back out again

Two asteroids set to cross Earth’s orbit just hours apart while another Great Pyramid-sized space rock barrels our way

Two asteroids set to cross Earth’s orbit just hours apart as another Great Pyramid-sized space rock barrels our way. Picture: Pixabay / urikyo33 Two 100-meter-wide asteroids are set to cross Earth’s orbit within hours of each other on Friday, September 25, 2020.Meanwhile, another space rock the size of ancient Egypt’s Great Pyramid of Giza is heading towards our planet. NASA’s Center for Near Earth Object Studies, which tracks asteroids and comets that will come close to Earth, has confirmed that it is monitoring two asteroids that are due to hurtle past on Friday, September 25. Both bodies are classed as Apollo asteroids, meaning they will cross Earth’s orbit as they fly through space. The first asteroid, which is named 2020 RO, is estimated to be up to 130 meters wide. It will fly past on September 25 at 00:10 EST at a speed of 11.84km per second. The second asteroid, named 2020 SM, is expected to sail past Earth later that day, at a speed of 18.43 km per second. The slightly smaller space rock is estimated to measure up to 100 meters in diameter. Although both asteroids are classed as near-Earth objects (NEOs) they are forecast to sail safely past our planet, despite coming into contact with its orbit. They were both discovered this year. On September 29, another giant 200-meter-wide space rock will silently pass Earth at a distance of around 1.78 million miles. The enormous visitor is comparable in size to Ancient Egypt’s Great Pyramid of Giza. The interesting spate of asteroidal activity comes hot on the heels of an amateur astronomer in Brazil discovering a large asteroid that somehow slipped past Earth’s main planetary defenses just last month.  The discovery served as a reminder to the world’s space agencies that there are still many asteroids out there that have yet to be detected. Meanwhile a large meteorite chunk was found last month in Brazil too. Imagine now one of those gigantic asteroids impacting earth. OMG! More space news on RT, Strange Sounds and Steve Quayle. Follow us: Facebook and Twitter. By the way you can also support us on Paypal. Please and thank you!

Continue Reading Two asteroids set to cross Earth’s orbit just hours apart while another Great Pyramid-sized space rock barrels our way

Mysterious “Object A” (2020-063G) left in orbit by China’s ‘Spaceplane’ baffles astronomers

China’s new space plane returned to Earth on Sept. 6th. But it left something behind in orbit, an item of unknown character called “Object A” by the US military. A view of the Jiuquan launch center from the Sentinel-2 satellite. China’s reusable experimental spacecraft launched from the facility Sept. 4. Credit: Modified Copernicus Sentinel data 2020 Last night in the Netherlands, Marco Langbroek tracked it across the sky using a hand-pointed video camera. “It showed slow but marked brightness changes, between magnitude +4 and invisible (fainter than +7),” says Langbroek. “The light curve shows two brightness peaks, and two major fading episodes. Peak-to-peak period is about 80 seconds, so if this is due to a tumble, it is a slow tumble.“ [embedded content] Object A is also a source of radio transmissions. Amateur radio operator Scott Tilley has detected it at 2280 MHz, and says that the radio signal waxes and wanes with a period near 80 seconds–akin to Langbroek’s light curve.  Had some time this morning to reduce the Chinese spaceplane OBJECT A data and compare to @Marco_Langbroek visual results. Interestingly the fading and null timing I was seeing was close to his 80 sec measurement. https://t.co/7FTrlJDTKE pic.twitter.com/tsJyb464La — Scott Tilley (@coastal8049) September 20, 2020 What does it all mean? Speculation is that Object A is either an inspector satellite used to inspect the outside of the Chinese space plane before landing; or maybe some jettisoned support module. This does not appear to be just a piece of debris. Radio observers discovered that it sends a signal in the L-band near 2280 MHz, something debris doesn’t do. The Chinese spaceplane appears to have released a satellite object 46395. These observations indicate it emits on 2280MHz. The modulation appears unusual for a Chinese satellite. https://t.co/otnkC30sQf — Scott Tilley (@coastal8049) September 14, 2020 So, this appears to be an interesting object that had or has some function, including a radio data signal downlink. It does not appear to have manoeuvered so far, and if it is tumbling (see below) it isn’t likely to do so. Speculation is that it is either an inspector satellite used to inspect the outside of the Chinese spaceplane before landing: or maybe some jettisoned support module. The ejection from the ‘Reusable Test Spacecraft’ appears to have taken place some two revolutions before landing, or perhaps even earlier In other words, no one knows! More mysterious space news on SatTrackCam, Strange Sounds and Steve Quayle. Follow us: Facebook and Twitter. By the way you can also support us on Paypal. Please and thank you!

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Would you expect anything else from 2020? RARE and spooky FULL MOON on Halloween will be visible to the entire world and not for just parts of it

Rare and spooky full moon on Halloween 2020. Picture: NASA/Kim Shiflett In the bizarre year that’s 2020, another highly unusual event is headed our way.This year’s Halloween full moon will be visible to the entire world, rather than just parts of it, for the first time since World War II, astronomy educator and former planetarium director Jeffrey Hunt says.  “When I was teaching, my high school students thought a full moon occurred every Halloween,” saind Hunt. Not quite, though pop culture decorations sure make it seem that way. The last Halloween full moon visible around the globe came in 1944, he said. He’s written about the event on his web site, When the Curves Line Up. There was a Halloween full moon for some locations in 1955, but that didn’t include western North America and the western Pacific, Hunt says. [embedded content] While this year’s Halloween full moon will be visible in all parts of the globe, that doesn’t mean every single citizen will have a view. Residents across both North America and South America will see it, as will India, all of Europe and much of Asia. But while Western Australians will see it, those in the central and eastern parts of the country will not.  Know time zones well? “Every time zone has it except those east of (GMT) +8 time zones if they have daylight time, or (GMT) +9 with no daylight time,” Hunt says. Want to see the Halloween full moon? It’s so bright at the full phase it doesn’t matter if you’re in a crowded city or out on the farm. And you don’t need pricey equipment. “Walk outside, and take a look,” Hunt says.  If you’re too busy watching horror movies, you’ll have to wait until 2039 for another global full moon. Next will take place in 2058, 2077 and 2096. The next full moon is on October 1, 2020 (Harvest Moon)… So the Halloween’s moon is also known as a ‘Blue Moon’ – the name given to the second full moon to appear in a calendar month. Just keep your eyes to the sky and enjoy the spooky sky show. More information on Fox10Phoenix, CNET, Strange Sounds and Steve Quayle. Follow us: Facebook and Twitter. By the way you can also support us on Paypal. Please and thank you!

Continue Reading Would you expect anything else from 2020? RARE and spooky FULL MOON on Halloween will be visible to the entire world and not for just parts of it

Signs of Alien Life on Venus

Is there life on Venus? Scientists detect traces of phosphine gas that could be coming from MICROBES in clouds swirling high in the planet’s atmosphere. Venus is an inhospitable planet of our solar system… But could actually harbor life after the detection of phosphine in its atmosphere. Picture: NASA Traces of phosphine gas detected in the clouds above Venus could be an indication that the planet supports microbial life, a new study has concluded. On Earth, phosphine — a colourless gas that smells like garlic, or decaying fish — is naturally produced mainly by certain microorganisms in the absence of oxygen. It can also be released in small amounts from the breakdown of organic matter, or industrially synthesised in chemical plants. Experts from the UK, however, found signs of phosphine in Venus’ atmosphere — suggesting the planet must support unknown chemical processes, or even life. Venus inhospitable The second-closest planet to the Sun, Venus is inhospitable — with a surface temperature around 867°F (464°C) and pressure 92 times that of on the Earth. However, its upper cloud deck — 33–38 miles (53–62 kilometres) above the surface — is a more temperate 120°F (50°C), with a pressure equal to that at Earth sea level. The clouds are also highly acidic — meaning that the phosphine would be broken down very quickly and must therefore be being continually replenished. The researchers have cautioned, however, that life is only one possible explanation for the source of the phosphine — with further investigation needed. Signs of Alien Life on Venus after scientists discover phosphine molecule. Picture: Nature The new study In their new study, astronomer Jane Greaves of Wales’ Cardiff University and colleagues observed Venus using both the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope at Hawaii’s Mauna Kea Observatory and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array in Chile. They detected a so-called spectral signature that is unique to phosphine — and furthermore were able to estimated that the gas is present in Venus’ clouds in an abundance of around 20 parts-per-billion. [embedded content] The team explored assorted ways that the gas could have been produced in this setting — including from sources on the surface of the planet, micrometeorites, lightning, or chemical processes happening within the clouds themselves. However, they were unable to determine exactly what is the source of the detected trace quantities of the gas. The researchers have cautioned that the detection of phosphine is not itself robust evidence for alien microbial life — and only indicates that potentially unknown geological or chemical processes are occurring on the planet. Further observations and modelling will be needed, they added, to better explore the origin of the gas in the planet’s atmosphere. ‘Phosphine could originate from unknown photochemistry or geochemistry — or, by analogy with biological production of phosphine on Earth, from the presence of life,‘ the research team wrote in their paper. ‘If no known chemical process can explain phosphine within the upper atmosphere of Venus, then it must be produced by a process not previously considered plausible for Venusian conditions,‘ they added. ‘This could be unknown photochemistry or geochemistry — or possibly life.‘ ‘Even if confirmed, we emphasise that the detection of phosphine is not robust evidence for life, only for anomalous and unexplained chemistry.‘ More information about extreterrestrial life in our solar system on Nature, DailyMail, Strange Sounds and Steve Quayle. Follow us: Facebook and Twitter. By the way you can also support us on Paypal. Please and thank you!

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If NASA Couldn’t See The Asteroid That Just Whizzed By Us, What Else Can’t They See?

Continue Reading If NASA Couldn’t See The Asteroid That Just Whizzed By Us, What Else Can’t They See?