The Collapse of ISIS: Terrorist Group Sees 60% Drop in Casualties, over 70% Drop in Beheadings in Trump Era

When the Pew Research Center asked registered voters in summer 2016 what the top issues influencing their votes were, 80 percent said that terrorism was "very important," more than any issue but the economy. In summer 2020, the issue did not even make the top 12.

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Watch: Palestinian Islamic Scholar Warns Muslim Armies Coming to 'Crush Paris'

Palestinian Islamic scholar Sheikh Ali Abu Ahmad used an address at the Al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem to warn French President Emmanuel Macron and all the “infidels who have acted with insolence against Muslims” to get ready for holy war. Sheikh Ahmad said boycotts of French products “do not change a thing” and the only solution is the reestablishment of the

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Reports: Syrians Wave Islamic State Flags to Protest French Cartoons

Photos and videos circulating online on Tuesday appear to show the Islamic State (ISIS) terror group flag at a demonstration on Sunday in northeastern Syria. Local Muslims organized the rally to protest French President Emmanuel Macron’s recent comments denouncing Islamists’ use of violence in response to cartoons. The anti-Macron protest took place in Sari Kani (Ras al-Ain), a town currently controlled by Turkish-backed jihadists.

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At least 18 dead in suicide bomb attack in Kabul

At least 18 people have been killed and 57 wounded, including schoolchildren, in a suicide bomb attack outside an education centre in Kabul, the Afghan interior ministry said. The explosion struck outside an education centre in a heavily Shia neighbourhood of western Kabul, Dasht-e-Barchi. The interior ministry spokesman, Tariq Arian, said the attacker was trying to enter the centre when he was stopped by security guards. He said the casualty toll may rise further as family members of the victims are still searching the hospitals where the wounded have been taken. No group claimed immediate responsibility for the bombing. The Taliban rejected any connection with the attack. An affiliate of the so-called Islamic State claimed responsibility for a similar suicide attack at an education centre in August 2018, in which 34 students were killed. Within Afghanistan, Isis has launched large-scale attacks on minority Shia, Sikhs and Hindus, whom it views as apostates. Hundreds of Sikhs and Hindus in Afghanistan fled the country in September after a gunman loyal to the militant group killed 25 members of the shrinking community in an attack on a place of worship in Kabul. The US signed a peace deal with the Taliban in February, opening up a path toward withdrawing American troops from the conflict. US officials said the deal would also help refocus security efforts on fighting Isis, which is a rival of the Taliban in Afghanistan. There has been an upsurge in violence between Taliban and Afghan forces in the country recently, even as representatives from the two warring sides begin peace talks in Doha to end the decades-long war in the country. Earlier on Saturday a roadside bomb killed nine people in eastern Afghanistan after it struck a minivan full of civilians, a local official said. A Ghazni province police spokesman said a second roadside bomb killed two policemen, after it struck their vehicle that was making its way to the victims of the first explosion. He added the bombings had wounded several others, and that the attacks were under investigation. No one immediately claimed responsibility for the attacks. The provincial police spokesman claimed the Taliban had placed the bomb.

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'The militias are not allowing us back': Sunnis languish in camps, years after recapture of Mosul

On a midsummer morning six years ago, Ziad Abdulqader Nasir’s short walk to Friday prayers at Mosul’s Great Mosque of al-Nuri, one of Iraq’s oldest shrines, was abruptly interrupted by the arrival of stern men carrying guns. Nasir and his neighbours were ushered inside, some of the newcomers set up cameras, and others sat the puzzled worshippers in neat lines on the carpet. “I said to my son Yousuf, someone important was coming,” Nasir recalled. “They were mostly foreigners. They told us to turn off any phones with cameras, and then all the signals jammed. Gunmen were lining the streets as far as 500 metres away. A guy announced that the caliph would give a sermon, and then Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi appeared.” That day, 4 July 2014, marked the only public appearance of the self-declared leader of the Islamic State before his return to years in hiding, then death in exile last year. His appearance prompted tens of thousands of people to rally to the cause he proclaimed. It also accelerated the unravelling of much of Syria and Iraq, both which remain broken and unreconciled. Six years on, at least 400,000 Iraqis who fled from Isis, or who lived in areas where the extremists held sway, remain in internment camps across the north of the country, forbidden to return home, or unwilling to attempt it. Most are Sunni Iraqis, like Baghdadi and his followers, who fear that after the victory over Isis, they are no longer considered partners in postwar Iraq.

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Khan's London: Man Convicted of Disseminating Islamic State Propaganda

A man has been convicted of disseminating Islamic State propaganda via Facebook and WhatsApp groups following a Metropolitan Police investigation. According to an official police statement, 29-year-old Shehroz Iqbal, of east London, was arrested after he “shared a Daesh propaganda video on his open Facebook page” — ‘Daesh’ being the politically correct term for the Islamic State preferred by officials

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Trump Warns 'A Nation Without Borders Is Not a Nation' After 'Vicious' Beheading in France

President Trump warned that “a nation without borders is not a nation” as he is extended his “sincere condolences” to France over the “vicious, vicious Islamic terrorist attack” which saw an educator publicly beheaded for showing images of the Islamic prophet during lessons on freedom of expression. “Immigration security is national security, remember that,” President Trump told supporters at a

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Solidarity Demonstrations for French Teacher Beheaded for Showing Images of Prophet Mohammed

PARIS (AP) — Demonstrations around France have been called in support of freedom of speech and to pay tribute to a French history teacher who was beheaded near Paris after discussing caricatures of Islam’s Prophet Muhammad with his class. Samuel Paty was beheaded on Friday by an 18-year-old Moscow-born Chechen refugee who was shot dead by police. Political leaders, associations,

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Mother of ISIS Defector Demands French Govt Send Cash to Them in Syria

The mother of an Islamic State extremist being held in northern Syria has demanded the French government send money to the defector or allow her family to send aid. The jihadist, a woman in her thirties, is currently being held in the al-Hol prison camp in northern Syria along with her three children. The mother of the woman has taken

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After Isis, Yazidi women forced to leave their children behind

As bombs crunched into the ground around them in February last year, three young Yazidi women cowered in holes dug in the eastern Syrian desert, cradling their terrified children.In the month that followed, hundreds of people hiding near them were killed by devastating barrages that destroyed what was left of Islamic State’s so-called caliphate and freed the former slaves and their toddlers from five years in the terror group’s clutches.But the ordeal of their lives was yet to begin. The trio, then aged 19, 20 and 24, and their five toddlers were thrown onto the last lorry out of the town of Baghouz, the black banners of the extremists replaced by the white flags of surrender, and driven to al-Hawl refugee camp where tens of thousands of people from towns and cities seized from Isis were being interned.The women lay low in the camp, worried about being discovered by Kurdish guards who would identify them as former captives and separate them from other detainees. For a month they lived with a dilemma: being identified could deliver freedom, but it could bring a greater heartache than the horrors under Isis – being separated from their children, maybe for ever.For Yazidi women who gave birth to children of Isis fighters, those worst fears have now been realised. Their communities in Iraq have demanded they leave their children in Syria before they are accepted home. The forced separations have led to dozens of women being estranged from their children, some of whom they were told to hand over as soon as they gave birth.Nearly two years after the collapse of Isis, what to do with the children born to extremists, and how to reunite families created and broken in such circumstances, remains far from being resolved among Yazidi communities and Iraqi officials. Even in Europe, where many Yazidis have been given asylum, those with the children of Isis have not found governments welcoming.“I have 22 young mothers in my care,” said Dr Nemam Ghafouri, the founder of Joint Help for Kurdistan, a charity that supports Yazidi women. “There are 56 children in the orphanage in Rumaila in Syria. We believe there are many dozens more such women and children.”

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Defending Iraq Needs To Be Iraq’s Job, Not The United States’s

Pentagon spokeswoman Cmdr. Jessica L. McNulty announced last week that the United States “continues to reduce our troop presence in Iraq from about 5,200 to 3,000.” In what should be a red flag to every American, she added that the United States remains committed “to ensuring the enduring defeat of ISIS and supporting Iraq’s long-term security, stability, and prosperity.” That

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