Ginsburg's Death; Bitter Ends; Pen Pals; Attend Our Virtual Briefing

Good morning. It's Monday, Sept. 21, 2020, the last day of a very difficult summer in American history. In case you were camping over the weekend and didn't take your mobile phone, the already contentious 2020 presidential race was thrown into further turmoil by the death of widely admired feminist legal pioneer and Supreme Court superstar Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Her dying wish was that her seat not become a pawn in the current election, a wish that has not been granted. Over the weekend, the United States also passed a grim milestone (by some tallies): COVID-19 has now claimed more than 200,000...

Continue Reading Ginsburg's Death; Bitter Ends; Pen Pals; Attend Our Virtual Briefing

'Bounty' Collusion? Trump's Path; Quote of the Week

Good morning, it's Friday, Sept. 18, 2020, the day of the week when I reprise an instructive or inspirational quotation. Today's quote comes from a battlefield in the Netherlands on this date in 1944, and from U.S. Army lieutenant named Ralph A. Watson. Lt. Watson's communication, sent by messenger, was to another 101st Airborne division officer, Maj. John P. Stopka. It was brief and to the point: "You are in command of the Battalion." But there was much more to it than that, as I'll recount in moment. First, I'll point you to RealClearPolitics' front page, which presents our poll averages,...

Continue Reading 'Bounty' Collusion? Trump's Path; Quote of the Week

Biden and Masks; Facebook’s Study; the Catholic Factor

Good morning, it's Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020. Sixty years ago today, the Democratic Party's presidential nominee went to the eastern part of North Carolina. Although this sounds like normal activity in a presidential election year, it was actually a rarity at the time. Until John F. Kennedy's campaign swing, the most recent time a presidential candidate had shown up in eastern Carolina had been when William Jennings Bryan stumped there in 1896. But on Sept. 17, 1960, Massachusetts' junior senator, John F. Kennedy, made the trip despite being cautioned by the Democrats' old guard that the area...

Continue Reading Biden and Masks; Facebook’s Study; the Catholic Factor

Biden and COVID; ActBlue Under Scrutiny; Attacking Wall Street

Good morning, it's Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020. One hundred years ago today, The New York City sky was the same "unbelievable blue," to use Bruce Springsteen's phrase, that it would be eight decades later on 9/11. Almost instantly, however, the air was black with smoke, the street red with blood. A horse-drawn wagon with a covered cargo pulled up in front of the J.P. Morgan building at 23 Wall St., near the intersection with Broad Street, a place known simply as The Corner. The House of Morgan, as historian Ron Chernow wrote, "spoke to foreign governments as the official voice of the American...

Continue Reading Biden and COVID; ActBlue Under Scrutiny; Attacking Wall Street

California GOP; Imperiled Tillis; Golfing to the Fore

Good morning, it's Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020, the birthday of William Howard Taft. The big man was born on this date in 1857, in Cincinnati, Ohio, and although he had an exceptionally successful career in public service, he is remembered today mainly for being fat. Ask an American to tell you something about the 27th U.S. president and, if they recall anything at all, it would be that Taft was so obese he got stuck in a bathtub at the White House. This anecdote is not only mean, it's almost certainly untrue. It's also unfair to the man's legacy. William Taft, whose first love was the law, not...

Continue Reading California GOP; Imperiled Tillis; Golfing to the Fore

Media 'Berlin Wall'; Lessons From CovidMerica; Uncommon Valor

Good morning, it's Monday, Sept. 14, 2020. On this date in 1901, President William McKinley died after being shot by an unhinged gunman. It was the third time in 36 years, beginning with Abraham Lincoln's murder, that a popular U.S. president had been assassinated. Both McKinley and James A. Garfield had survived presumably more dangerous duty in the service of their country, namely as combat soldiers in the Civil War. They returned home from that crucible only to be shot in the streets of peacetime America. I'll have a further word on the 25th president of the United States, whom I've...

Continue Reading Media 'Berlin Wall'; Lessons From CovidMerica; Uncommon Valor

Judicial Shortlist; Black Governors; Captains Courageous

Good morning, it's Thursday, Sept. 10, 2020, the anniversary of one of the most memorable events in U.S. naval history. On this date in 1813, Oliver H. Perry, commanding a small American squadron, faced a formidable Royal Navy force of six warships on Lake Erie led by Cmdr. Robert Barclay. The battle would determine control of the Great Lakes, as Oliver Perry knew. On the eve of the battle he told his superiors, "If a victory is to be gained, I will gain it." There was, and he did, as we'll see in a moment. First, I'd point you to RealClearPolitics' front page, which presents our poll...

Continue Reading Judicial Shortlist; Black Governors; Captains Courageous

Vaccine Debate; Poll Errors; Quote of the Week

Good morning, it's Friday, Sept. 11, 2020. Nineteen years ago today, a coordinated terrorist attack against our country took the lives of 2,606 innocent civilians at the World Trade Center, 125 U.S. government employees at the Pentagon, and 246 souls trapped on four passenger jets hijacked by suicide bombers. Although much has happened in this country, and the world, in the ensuing years, the horror and the evil of that attack have not lessened with the passage of time. Friday is also the day when I reprise quotations intended to be instructive or inspirational. Today's quotes do not concern...

Continue Reading Vaccine Debate; Poll Errors; Quote of the Week